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How does your company rate against
best practices in recognition?

Complete this quick, 10 question survey, and find out!

You’ll get your recognition score instantly and see how you compare. For more detail, download a free custom report that tells you:

how your company measures up to industry best practices
how to best optimize your recognition program
how to use recognition to enhance company culture

What kind of recognition programs do you use in your organization today? (select all that apply)

Years of Service awards
Attendance awards
Strategic Recognition (recognition and rewards for behaviors that demonstrate company values)
Sales Incentives (e.g., “President’s Club”)
Awards for earning degrees or getting certifications
Awards for safety
Awards for health and wellness
We do not have an employee recognition program of any kind in place today.

Do you offer the same recognition company-wide or do programs vary by department, location or division?
(select one)

Most programs are managed independently by various leaders throughout the organization, without central oversight.
We have one company-wide program that’s centrally managed.
Programs vary by location/department/division with some central oversight by HR.

Is recognition directly linked to your company’s values or strategic objectives?
(select one)

Our core values and objectives are the basis of our recognition program, and they drive how employees are recognized.
We have a recognition strategy but it is not linked to our company values or objectives.
We don’t have an established strategy for recognition.

Which best describes who is eligible to participate in your
recognition program(s)?
(select one)

Managers nominate any employee in the organization.
Managers nominate employees, but there are restrictions on recognizing across departments/ functions/geographies.
All employees can nominate and receive awards from anyone.
All employees can nominate, but there are restrictions on recognizing across departments/ functions/geographies.

What best describes the scope of your recognition program?
(select one)

Fewer than 30% of employees are recognized annually.
30-60% of employees are recognized annually.
60-80% of employees are recognized annually.
80-100% of employees are recognized annually.
There’s no way for us to track the number of employees recognized.

How do your senior leaders feel about recognition?
(select one)

One or more of our C-level execs champions the program publicly across the company, regularly communicating the importance of recognition and reviewing program metrics.
Senior leaders may know about the program at some level, but the primary sponsor of the program is not on the executive team.
I’m not sure they know about our recognition efforts. We leave it to a program manager.

What do you spend annually on recognition?
(select one)

1% of payroll or more.
Less than 1% of payroll.
I have no idea, really.

How do you train employees and promote your recognition program?
(select one)

We made a splash when the program launched, but do not have any promotion or training program in place.
Ad hoc communications happen and some managers or departments do training, but we have no formal plan for training or promotion.
We have an established and regular plan for communicating and training all appropriate parties.

Which best describes how recognition awards are shared and communicated?
(select one)

We collect and periodically publicize recognition moments, such as in a newsletter.
We regularly make recognition moments public via electronic means or in meetings.
Recognition is always handled privately.

How do you measure and share the success of your recognition program?
(select one)

We measure and report to the executive team, using defined metrics.
HR tracks basic metrics and shares those reports within HR.
We don’t measure recognition in this way.
YOUR GRADE:

out of 500







Creating Report


 
 

Unfortunately, you’ve indicated that you do not currently have a
recognition program in place

That means at this time we have nothing we can evaluate. But do not lose hope! This also means that you’re in a
great position to build an effective recognition program from the ground up. We’d be happy to assist you with the tools to do this.

Here are some of the best practices of a great recognition program:

1. One strategic program
2.Company-wide and centrally managed
3.Integrates company core values and objectives
4.Universal across departments, functions and geographies
5.Broad, recognizing 80%+ of employees annually
6.Supported and publically championed by senior level executive(s)
7.Represents investment of 1% or more of payroll
8.Includes a regular plan for communicating and training
9.Offers timely and public recognition to maximize impact
10.Measures, reports and links recognition to business goals
Are you ready to bring your values to life and transform your recognition program into one that gets top marks? Visit us on the web at www.globoforce.com or email us at info@globoforce.com. To speak to one of our global consultants immediately, please call: +1 888 7 GFORCE or +353 866 06 5769 outside the U.S. and Canada.
YOUR GRADE:

out of 500
Dear (FIRST NAME),




ARE YOU READY TO BRING YOUR VALUES TO
LIFE AND TRANSFORM YOUR RECOGNITION
PROGRAM INTO ONE THAT GETS TOP MARKS?

Our strategists are ready to help align your company to best practices and help design a strategic recognition program that makes your values real in the day-to-day work of every employee.

Visit us on the web at www.globoforce.com
To speak to one of our global consultants immediately, please call: +1 888 7 GFORCE or +353 866 06 5769 outside the U.S. and Canada.
You've scored a (SCORE) out of 500 possible points. Below is a sampling of your report. Get the full recognition scorecard for detailed analysis on all 10 variables – offering simple adjustments that could make a huge difference in your recognition program.
You've scored a (SCORE) out of 500 possible points. Below is a sampling of your report. Get the full recognition scorecard for detailed analysis on all 10 variables – offering simple adjustments that could make a huge difference in your recognition program.
You've scored a (SCORE) out of 500 possible points. You're doing very well in recognition and have incorporated a number of best practices into your program. Below is a sampling of your report. Get the full recognition scorecard for detailed analysis on all 10 variables – offering useful recommendations to optimize your recognition program.
It’s good to see that you have some kind of recognition program at your company. Unfortunately, judging from your answers, it looks like you’re probably not focused on the most effective kind of recognition program – one that is designed to drive your business strategy. To be really effective, a recognition program must be linked to company culture and values.
Congratulations on having a strategic recognition program that rewards employees for behaviors that demonstrate company values! That means you’ve already got a solid foundation to build on. When you create these kinds of strategic programs, you build a powerful way to reinforce the culture you’re trying to cultivate at your company.
Because your recognition programs are independently managed by various leaders throughout the organization, with little or no central oversight, you are severely limiting your ability to deliver a truly strategic and effective recognition program. For a strong recognition program that drives bottom-line results, you must centralize.
We’re happy to see you have one company-wide program that’s centrally managed. You are meeting the best practice for program management, which is to centralize a program to drive bottom line results.
You said your programs vary by location/department/division with some central oversight by HR. While it’s good to have some central oversight by HR, you can build a much more effective program when you have one unified and completely consistent global recognition program.
It’s great to hear that you’re weaving your core values and objectives into your recognition program. This is critical to a truly strategic recognition program.
You reported your recognition strategy is independent from your company values. This is an area where you can greatly improve your recognition approach.
You told us you don’t have established goals for recognition. A hallmark of a good strategic recognition program is defining clear goals, including using your core values and objectives as reasons for recognition.
You’re halfway there! You told us in your program, most employees are eligible for recognition awards but only managers can nominate. Also, managers can nominate employees for recognition across departments and geographies. This meets about half of the best practice around participation. Unfortunately, you have a little work to do, because a truly effective program is one that encourages ownership and universally empowers.
It’s time to rethink this facet of your recognition strategy. You told us that only managers can nominate and most employees are eligible recipients, but there are restrictions on recognizing across departments, functions, and geographies. Your program is not one that encourages ownership or one that universally empowers employees.
You’ve nailed it on this one. Congratulations for creating a strong recognition program in which all employees are eligible as nominators and recipients, and all employees can nominate peers and colleagues across departments, functions and geographies. It is universal and it encourages ownership by everyone.
You are a step ahead of most by making all employees eligible to give recognition in your organization, but you could go farther. You understand the importance of empowerment, but are placing unnecessary limitations on your program that are preventing you from realizing the full benefits of strategic recognition.
Unfortunately, you are recognizing only 30% or fewer of your employees, and that is well below the industry best practice. In order to have an impact and yield results, your program must touch a more significant portion of your employees.
Unfortunately, you are recognizing only 30-79% or fewer of your employees, and while that is better than 0-30%, it is still below the industry best practice. In order to have an impact and yield results, your program must touch a more significant portion of your employees.
You are recognizing 60-80% or fewer of your employees. While you’re doing better than many and are on your way to good recognition, you still have not attained the industry best practice. In order to have an impact and yield results, your program must touch a more significant portion of your employees.
Congratulations! By recognizing 80-100% of employees annually you’ve achieved the primary requirement of a fully effective recognition program that touches the vast majority of your employees. You have attained the best practice for reach.
You told us that you have no way to track the number of employees recognized on an annual basis. That’s a problem. If you are unable to measure the number of employees recognized in a time period, you’ll really shooting in the dark when it comes to the effectiveness of your program.
You indicated one or more of your C-level executives publicly champions your recognition program, regularly communicating with everyone on the importance of recognition and reviewing program metrics. This is ideal and a best practice. Support for recognition from the top down is critical to maximizing the success of a program.
You said senior leaders may know about your recognition program at some level, but the primary sponsor of the program is not on the executive team. While this is certainly a positive, to maximize program performance you will need support from the very top of your company.
You reported you’re not sure senior leaders know about your recognition efforts, and you leave it to a program manager. You should work on getting executive buy-in. To maximize program performance you will need support from the very top of your company.
Your investment of 1% or more of payroll in employee recognition is well in line with best practice to see powerful program results if that investment is used wisely. Congratulations for hitting this important benchmark!
Unfortunately, your investment of less than 1% of payroll on recognition annually is probably not enough to realize the full potential of a global strategic recognition program. As a point of reference, according to a WorldatWork survey in 2011, organizations were budgeting an average of 2.0% of payroll for recognition programs.
You reported you have no idea how much you spend annually on recognition. This should be addressed, as it makes possible inappropriate or unguided recognition activities across your organization. Lack of oversight is a clear sign that you’re running an antiquated recognition program.
Making a splash at program launch is an important first step, but a recognition program is a marathon, not a sprint. It is important to program longevity and overall impact not to neglect promotion and training in the following months.
Relying on word of mouth to spread your recognition program throughout your organization will not help you achieve your program goals. The best practice for communication and training of recognition programs is to have a solid plan and execute on it consistently to ensure complete education and maximum adoption.
Congratulations to you for establishing a regular plan for communicating and training all appropriate parties on your recognition program! Ongoing communication and training create the foundation for an effective and impactful recognition program that excites and engages all employees.
You said you don’t make recognition moments public as they happen, but you will periodically publicize recognition. While you’re on the right track by periodically publicizing recognition awards, you may be missing out on an opportunity to create a true culture of recognition.
You’ve got it! Kudos to you. You have figured out how to properly share recognition moments. Your timely and public recognition patterns are the ideal way to maximize recognition and you’re spot on with this best practice.
You answered that recognition is always handled privately between nominator and recognition recipient. This is not the best practice around recognition. By using it you are depriving yourself of a lot of the benefits of social recognition.
Happily, you measure and report out program success much like you do your other business initiatives. This means you’ve linked recognition to business goals (where it belongs), and are capitalizing on the important information that recognition provides. This is a recognition best practice.
You said that HR tracks basic metrics, such as number of awards issued, and shares those reports within HR. You’re on the right path with tracking metrics, but you should expand your scope to take maximum advantage of your recognition data and align with best practices.
By focusing on other HR metrics you consider to be more critical and not measuring your recognition, you are missing out on an opportunity to show how your recognition initiative could be improving your organization’s bottom-line – a metric your CEO truly cares about. This does not align with the best practice around recognition reporting.
You've scored a (SCORE) out of 500 possible points. Below is a sampling of your report. Get the full recognition scorecard for detailed analysis on all 10 variables – offering simple adjustments that could make a huge difference in your recognition program.
You've scored a (SCORE) out of 500 possible points. Below is a sampling of your report. Get the full recognition scorecard for detailed analysis on all 10 variables – offering simple adjustments that could make a huge difference in your recognition program.
You've scored a (SCORE) out of 500 possible points. You're doing very well in recognition and have incorporated a number of best practices into your program. Below is a sampling of your report. Get the full recognition scorecard for detailed analysis on all 10 variables – offering useful recommendations to optimize your recognition program.
Too often, a company may think it has recognition in place, when that recognition is not effective. Stand-alone recognition programs such as years of service awards, attendance awards and sales incentive programs may have limited use, but they do not take the place of a true strategic recognition program. In fact, a recent survey by the analyst firm Bersin & Associates found that while nearly 75 percent of organizations have a recognition program, only 58 percent of employees think that their organizations have recognition programs. That’s the disconnect we see when recognition isn’t effective.

To create an effective culture of recognition, consider how you can create a strategic recognition program that rewards employees for behaviors that demonstrate company values. Studies have shown that recognition programs that are linked to company values are more effective in delivering on business goals and increasing employee engagement. When you create these kinds of strategic programs, you build a powerful way to drive success.
Too often, a company may think it has recognition in place, when that recognition is not effective. Stand-alone recognition programs such as years of service awards, attendance awards and sales incentive programs may have limited use, but they do not take the place of a true strategic recognition program. In fact, a recent survey by the analyst firm Bersin & Associates found that while nearly 75 percent of organizations have a recognition program, only 58 percent of employees think that their organizations have recognition programs. That’s the disconnect we see when recognition isn’t effective.

Studies have shown that recognition programs that are linked to company values are more effective in delivering on business goals and increasing employee engagement. When you create these kinds of strategic programs, you build a powerful way to drive success. You’re well on your way!
The benefits of centralized recognition programs are two-fold:
That means you’re likely realizing these benefits of centralized recognition programs:
The benefits of centralized recognition programs are two-fold:
A powerful way to take your corporate values off the plaque on the wall and inject them into employees’ day-to-day behaviors is to frequently recognize employees for living those values.

Research from Deloitte has shown that managers of higher profitability companies were 12% more likely to have a strong focus on core values and corporate culture. And a recent report from Bersin found that “those organizations that recognize employees for “demonstrating company values,” “displaying certain identified behaviors” and “achieving company goals” are more effective at enabling recognition than those that do not incorporate these attributes” It is a great sign that you have aligned to best practices in this way.
As we mentioned earlier, a truly strategic recognition program must be tied to your core values. The best way to take your corporate values off the plaque on the wall and inject them into employees’ day-to-day behaviors is to frequently recognize employees for living those values.

Research from Deloitte has shown that managers of higher profitability companies were 12% more likely to have a strong focus on core values and corporate culture. And a recent report from Bersin found that “those organizations that recognize employees for “demonstrating company values,” “displaying certain identified behaviors” and “achieving company goals” are more effective at enabling recognition than those that do not incorporate these attributes” Consider re-aligning your recognition so that it ties into your core values in this way.
As we mentioned earlier, a truly strategic recognition program, must be tied to your core values. The best way to take your corporate values off the plaque on the wall and inject them into employees’ day-to-day behaviors is to frequently recognize employees for living those values. 
Research from Deloitte has shown that managers of higher profitability companies were 12% more likely to have a strong focus on core values and corporate culture. And a recent report from Bersin found that “those organizations that recognize employees for “demonstrating company values,” “displaying certain identified behaviors” and “achieving company goals” are more effective at enabling recognition than those that do not incorporate these attributes” Consider setting clear goals for your recognition program that align with your core values in this way.
The best practice for participation is a universal program which includes and empowers all employees. To realize the full impact of strategic recognition, ALL employees must be empowered to recognize their peers, managers and direct reports. When you give employees permission to recognize any other, you make everyone keepers of the company culture, and you foster a true culture of recognition. This also provides you with powerful information about how your divisions and groups interact. And also gives you excellent data for performance evaluation that taps into the wisdom of crowds.

For more on how strategic recognition can help you with performance management, check out our white paper: “Performance Management, Meet the Wisdom of Crowds”
In today’s distributed workplace, it’s critical to build a culture where employees are recognizing coworkers regardless of department, function and geography. After all, your business is more successful when every department and every office works together rather than in silos. The best practice for participation is a universal program which includes and empowers all employees. To realize the full impact of strategic recognition, ALL employees must be empowered to recognize their peers, managers and direct reports. Your managers should be able to nominate employees around the company, regardless of department and location. That is important not only because it brings the company into greater synchronicity, but also because it provides you with powerful information about how your divisions and groups interact. And also gives you excellent data for performance evaluation that taps into the wisdom of crowds.

For more on how strategic recognition can help you with performance management, check out our white paper: “Performance Management, Meet the Wisdom of Crowds”
The best practice for participation is a universal program which includes and empowers all employees. In today’s distributed workplace, it’s critical to build a culture where employees are recognizing coworkers regardless of department, function and geography. Your managers can nominate employees around the company, regardless of department and location, and that is important not only because it brings the company into greater synchronicity, but also because it provides you with powerful information about how your divisions and groups interact. Kudos on understanding this and implementing a consistent recognition program in which all employees can take part.

Your response indicates you also understand that to realize the full impact of strategic recognition, all employees should be empowered to recognize peers, managers and direct reports. When you give employees permission to recognize any other, you make everyone keepers of the company culture, and you foster a true culture of recognition.

Did you know that a program with universal eligibility can also give you excellent data for performance evaluation that taps into the wisdom of crowds? For more on how strategic recognition can help you with performance management, check out our white paper: “Performance Management, Meet the Wisdom of Crowds”
Your response indicates you understand that to realize the full impact of strategic recognition, all employees should be empowered to recognize peers, managers and direct reports. When you give employees permission to recognize peers, you make everyone keepers of the company culture, and you foster a true culture of recognition And peer-to-peer program also gives you excellent data for performance evaluation that taps into the wisdom of crowds..

Yet, your program does have restrictions on recognizing across departments/ functions/geographies. The best practice for participation is a universal program which includes and empowers all employees. To realize the full impact of strategic recognition, ALL employees must be empowered to recognize their peers—even in other departments. This offers an area for improvement, because in today’s distributed workplace, it’s critical to build a culture where employees are recognizing coworkers regardless of department, function and geography.

For more on how strategic recognition can help you with performance management, check out our white paper: “Performance Management, Meet the Wisdom of Crowds”
How many employees should you be touching? Best practices say you should be recognizing 80-90% of employees in your program annually. it will be nearly impossible to realize the true potential of a recognition program when the vast majority of your employees aren’t touched by it in a given year.

One company that gets reach right is Intuit. When Stanford University studied what made Intuit’s recognition program effective, it found that frequency and pervasiveness of recognition were the critical factors. Intuit’s strategic “Spotlight” program has helped motivate Intuit’s workforce of 8,200 global employees through relevant, meaningful, on-the-spot rewards that are tied to company values, and has reached 85-90 percent of all eligible Intuit employees within two years. http://www.globoforce.com/intuit%27s_successful_employee_recognition_strategy
Best practices say you should be recognizing 80-90% of employees in your program annually. Think about it: If 80-90% of your employees don’t have at least one accomplishment that merits recognition over the course of the year, you likely have some fundamental performance problems. And if 80-90% of your employees do have at least one accomplishment that merits recognition over the course of the year, they should be getting recognized for it.

One company that gets reach right is Intuit. When Stanford University studied what made Intuit’s recognition program effective, it found that frequency and pervasiveness of recognition were the critical factors. Intuit’s strategic “Spotlight” program has helped motivate Intuit’s workforce of 8,200 global employees through relevant, meaningful, on-the-spot rewards that are tied to company values, and has reached 85-90 percent of all eligible Intuit employees within two years. http://www.globoforce.com/intuit%27s_successful_employee_recognition_strategy
Best practices say you should be recognizing 80-90% of employees in your program annually. Think about it: If 80-90% of your employees don’t have at least one accomplishment that merits recognition over the course of the year, you likely have some fundamental performance problems. And if 80-90% of your employees do have at least one accomplishment that merits recognition over the course of the year, they should be getting recognized for it.

One company that gets reach right is Intuit. When Stanford University studied what made Intuit’s recognition program effective, it found that frequency and pervasiveness of recognition were the critical factors. Intuit’s strategic “Spotlight” program has helped motivate Intuit’s workforce of 8,200 global employees through relevant, meaningful, on-the-spot rewards that are tied to company values, and has reached 85-90 percent of all eligible Intuit employees within two years. http://www.globoforce.com/intuit%27s_successful_employee_recognition_strategy
Think about it: If 80-90% of your employees have at least one accomplishment that merits recognition over the course of the year, they should be getting recognized for it. You have resolved this issue by adequately including employees in your program. Congratulations!

Another company that gets reach right is Intuit. When Stanford University studied what made Intuit’s recognition program effective, it found that frequency and pervasiveness of recognition were the critical factors. Intuit’s strategic “Spotlight” program has helped motivate Intuit’s workforce of 8,200 global employees through relevant, meaningful, on-the-spot rewards that are tied to company values, and has reached 85-90 percent of all eligible Intuit employees within two years. http://www.globoforce.com/intuit%27s_successful_employee_recognition_strategy
In order to manage things, you have to be able to measure them. You are also leaving yourself open to tax compliance and general fairness issues with unaccounted recognition. The industry best practice for reach is to recognize between 80-90% of your employees annually. If 80-90% of your employees don’t have at least one accomplishment that merits recognition over the course of the year, you likely have some fundamental performance problems. And if 80-90% of your employees do have at least one accomplishment that merits recognition over the course of the year, they should be getting recognized for it.

One company that gets reach right is Intuit. When Stanford University studied what made Intuit’s recognition program effective, it found that frequency and pervasiveness of recognition were the critical factors. Intuit’s strategic “Spotlight” program has helped motivate Intuit’s workforce of 8,200 global employees through relevant, meaningful, on-the-spot rewards that are tied to company values, and has reached 85-90 percent of all eligible Intuit employees within two years. http://www.globoforce.com/intuit%27s_successful_employee_recognition_strategy
As with any major area of focus for a company, having the attention, support and participation of senior leaders is critical to success. When the company sees that senior leaders embrace a culture of recognition, they will be far more likely to embrace it themselves.
 If you need a compelling business case to help keep executives committed to Strategic Recognition, you may find some in this paper recently published by Globoforce: 5 Reasons You Need Strategic Recognition.
It’s good that your senior leaders know about the program, but it’s simply not enough for them to be passive witnesses to the program. Having the attention, support and participation of senior leaders is critical to success. When the company sees that senior leaders embrace a culture of recognition, they will be far more likely to embrace it themselves.

Spend some time educating senior leaders on the quantifiable business case for recognition. Calculate your turnover costs and present them—did you know that according to the Wall Street Journal, “Awards, recognition and praise might just be the single most cost-effective way to maintain a happy, productive work force?”

If you need a compelling business case to offer executives to buy in to Strategic Recognition, you may find some in this paper recently published by Globoforce: 5 Reasons You Need Strategic Recognition.
If your leaders haven’t bought into the program, it’s highly unlikely your program will achieve company-wide effectiveness. Having the attention, support and participation of senior leaders is critical to success. When the company sees that senior leaders embrace a culture of recognition, they will be far more likely to embrace it themselves.

Spend some time educating senior leaders on the quantifiable business case for recognition. Calculate your turnover costs and present them—did you know that according to the Wall Street Journal, “Awards, recognition and praise might just be the single most cost-effective way to maintain a happy, productive work force?”

If you need a compelling business case to offer executives to buy in to Strategic Recognition, you may find some in this paper recently published by Globoforce: 5 Reasons You Need Strategic Recognition.
It is important to invest in a recognition program, because the returns you see will be substantial. As a point of reference, according to a WorldatWork survey in 2011, organizations were budgeting an average of 2.0% of payroll for recognition programs.

What benefits can you expect from your investment in recognition? When implemented strategically, we’ve seen clients decrease unwanted employee turnover by up to 15% and increase employee engagement by up to 25% within a year of launching strategic recognition programs.

The impact of those improvements in retention and engagement directly affect your bottom line. According to research from Towers-Watson, companies with high engagement have a 44% higher operating margin than companies with low engagement. In other words, employee engagement not only leads to happier employees, but it leads to better financial results.
If you were to increase your investment to 1% or more of payroll for a truly strategic recognition program, you could realize results similar to our clients who have decreased unwanted employee turnover by up to 15% and increased employee engagement by up to 25% within a year.

The impact of those improvements in retention and engagement directly affect your bottom line. According to research from Towers-Watson, companies with high engagement have a 44% higher operating margin than companies with low engagement. In other words, employee engagement not only leads to happier employees, but it leads to a better financial results.
Gaining governance and oversight of their recognition investment across all locations has saved our clients up to 50% of their investment in recognition while also eliminating risk associated with improper reporting of recognition activity. As a point of reference, according to a WorldatWork survey in 2011, organizations were budgeting an average of 2.0% of payroll for recognition programs.

Investing 1% or more of payroll in strategic recognition also leads to decreased unwanted employee turnover by up to 15% and increasing employee engagement by up to 25% within a year.

The impact of those improvements in retention and engagement directly affect your bottom line. According to research from Towers-Watson, companies with high engagement have a 44% higher operating margin than companies with low engagement. In other words, employee engagement not only leads to happier employees, but it leads to a better financial results.
Like any other business imperative, to get adoption, you need to have ongoing communications and training on the topic. Think about it this way: Promote or perish.

Just a few of the communications and training best practices that best-of-breed companies commit to are:
You said that your have ad hoc communications about your recognition program and some managers are trained, but you rely on word of mouth more than anything else. It sounds like you’re essentially leaving it to chance, which isn’t a great strategy when it comes to important initiatives. Strategic programs that can fundamentally change the culture of your organization and increase employee engagement, productivity, performance and retention simply cannot be left to chance. Like any other business imperative, to get adoption, you need to have ongoing communications and training on the topic. Think about it this way: Promote or perish.

Just a few of the communications and training best practices that best-of-breed companies commit to are:
Think about it this way: Promote or perish!

Just a few of the communications and training best practices that best-of-breed companies commit to are:
To truly embed recognition into the daily lives of employees the way best-of-breed companies do, you want to create recognition moments that other employees can both see and amplify through their own words of congratulations. When you pull the whole company into the recognition experience, you create a dynamic in which management and rank-and-file employees alike become keepers of the company culture. When the reinforcement of company values comes from every direction, your recognition program becomes that much more potent.

The most effective recognition platforms allow employees to recognize their direct reports, peers or superiors. Strategic Social Recognition® programs also allow people to easily see what their coworkers have been recognized for while providing easy mechanisms to say “Congratulations!” and share those congratulations publicly within the company walls. This pulls all employees into the recognition experience, empowers your people, and amplifies how meaningful recognition can be.
By deploying your program in a way that recognition is easily shared with coworkers through some combination of your intranet, frequent and automated recognition emails, a recognition platform “award news feed,” and staff meetings, you’ve created a truly strategic recognition practice.

To embed recognition into the daily lives of employees the way best-of-breed companies do, you want to create recognition moments that other employees can both see and amplify through their own words of congratulations. When you pull the whole company into the recognition experience, you create a dynamic in which management and rank-and-file employees alike become keepers of the company culture. When the reinforcement of company values comes from every direction, your recognition program becomes that much more potent.

The most effective recognition platforms are just like yours; they allow employees to recognize their direct reports, peers or superiors. Social Recognition® programs also allow people to easily see what their coworkers have been recognized for while providing easy mechanisms to say “Congratulations!” and share those congratulations publicly within the company walls. This pulls all employees into the recognition experience, empowers your people, and amplifies how meaningful recognition can be.
Unfortunately, by keeping things private you’re missing out on an opportunity to create a true culture of recognition in your organization. To embed recognition into the daily lives of employees the way best-of-breed companies do, you want to create transparent recognition moments that other employees can both see and amplify through their own words of congratulations. When you pull the whole company into the recognition experience, you create a dynamic in which management and rank-and-file employees alike become keepers of the company culture. When the reinforcement of company values comes from every direction, your recognition program becomes that much more potent.

The most effective recognition platforms allow employees to recognize their direct reports, peers or superiors. Social Recognition® programs also allow people to easily see what their coworkers have been recognized for while providing easy mechanisms to say “Congratulations!” and share those congratulations publicly within the company of the company. This pulls all employees into the recognition experience, empowers your people, and amplifies how meaningful recognition can be.
Good practices around measurement means you’ve set yourself up to get real return on your recognition investment. Strategic recognition programs reinforce company values, fortify company culture, increase employee engagement, and decrease unwanted employee turnover. Recognition data can show us how well values are performing, who our top performers and outliers are, and how departments and individuals are working together. It can also give you very valuable information for talent management and performance reviews.

There is a proven link between how well we use talent intelligence and the financial performance of our companies. According to a recent HCI/Taleo report, “Organizations that rated themselves “proficient” in workforce data analysis were far more likely […] to financially outperform those who rated themselves as “deficient” at workforce data analysis.”

Congratulations on getting this one right; it’s a great way to end your recognition assessment.
Tracking data within HR is good, and doing so puts you ahead of some companies. But simple metrics such as number of awards issued don’t help you assess program impact to the organization’s bottom line or recognition ROI. Recognition data can show us how well values are performing, who our top performers and outliers are, and how departments and individuals are working together. It can also give you very valuable information for talent management and performance reviews.

There is a proven link between how well we use talent intelligence and the financial performance of our companies. According to a recent HCI/Taleo report, “Organizations that rated themselves “proficient” in workforce data analysis were far more likely […] to financially outperform those who rated themselves as “deficient” at workforce data analysis.”
Strategic recognition programs reinforce company values, fortify company culture, increase employee engagement, and decrease unwanted employee turnover. Recognition data can show us how well values are performing, who our top performers and outliers are, and how departments and individuals are working together. It can also give you very valuable information for talent management and performance reviews.

There is a proven link between how well we use talent intelligence and the financial performance of our companies. According to a recent HCI/Taleo report, “Organizations that rated themselves “proficient” in workforce data analysis were far more likely […] to financially outperform those who rated themselves as “deficient” at workforce data analysis.”